English Language Dictionary
English Language Dictionary

English Language Help (24)

Articles helping people who are learning English as a foreign language.

Martha Ryan

Specially vs Especially - the difference

The English Language adverbs Specially and Especially are often confused, even by native English speakers. I will explain the difference using British English usage and examples. Especially means "particularly", "exceptionally" or "above all others". For example "I love flowers, especially pink ones" means that I…

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Martha Ryan

Make up your mind vs. Decide

The English language phrases "make up your mind" and "decide" (or "make a decision") have similar but subtly different meanings as I will describe using British English examples. To make up your mind means to form an opinion. When you make up your mind you…

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Martha Ryan

Dreaded and Scared: the difference

The English Language words dreaded and scared are similar, but different, as I will show using British English examples. Someone is scared when they experience something scary. Scary things cause fear. This fear can be rational or irrational. An example of being scared irrationally is: "I…

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Martha Ryan

Calm Down and Go Easy - the differences

The English language phrases Calm Down and Go Easy have related meanings, but they are different, as I shall explain, using British English examples. Calm Down (verb) is an instruction to the listener to reduce their level of emotion. It is often used towards children,…

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Martha Ryan

Queue and Row: the differences

The English Language nouns Queue and Row have related meanings, but they are different, as I shall explain, using British English examples. Queue (noun) means a line of people waiting for something, where the person at the head of the queue will be served next.

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Martha Ryan

Passion and Compassion: the differences

The English language nouns Passion and Compassion have related meanings, but they are different, as I shall explain, using British English examples. Passion is a strong emotional feeling, which can be romantic or a compelling liking for something, or an overwhelming interest in something, such as a…

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Martha Ryan

Faithful, Loyal: the differences

The English language adjectives Faithful and Loyal have related meanings, but they are different, as I shall explain, using British English examples. Loyal means to do your best for an idea, person or organization, not to betray it. Someone who displays loyalty does not do…

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