English Language Dictionary
English Language Dictionary

English Language Help (22)

Articles helping people who are learning English as a foreign language.

Martha Ryan

Difference between On Guard and Look Out

The English language verbs On Guard and Look Out have related meanings, but they are different, as I shall explain, using British English examples. To Be On Guard means someone who is looking for potential danger or a threat. "Entering the dark alley after midnight,…

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Martha Ryan

Difference between Get Out and Go Out

The English language verbs Get Out and Go Out have related meanings, but they are different, as I shall explain, using British English examples. To Go Out implies movement from being in to being out. It is used when the destination is more important than…

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Martha Ryan

Difference between Movement and Motion

The English language nouns Movement and Motion have related meanings, but they are different, as I shall explain, using British English examples. Motion implies changing position without intent. It describes the physical properties of moving. It is normally emphasising something is not stationary, rather than…

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Martha Ryan

Difference between Can and May

The English language verbs Can and May have similar meanings, but they are different, as I shall explain, using British English examples. Can means "to be able to", the ability to do something. "Can you swim underwater for 2 minutes?" "I can speak French." May…

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Martha Ryan

Difference between Trip, Travel and Journey

The English language nouns Trip, Travel and Journey have related meanings, but they are all different, as I shall explain, using British English examples. Trip means a single act of going from somewhere to somewhere else and (normally) back again. Examples: "My trip to France…

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Martha Ryan

Difference between Around and Surround

The English language words Around and Surround are similar, but not the same. I explain the difference here, using British English examples. Surround means an uninterrupted circle of something around something else. "The forest surrounds the hotel." If the centre is a person, this could…

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Martha Ryan

Difference between Obedient and Assertive

The English language adjectives Obedient and Assertive are similar in meaning, but there are differences as I shall explain, using British English examples. Obedient comes from obey (verb). It means doing what someone else (normally someone in power, like a teacher or parent) tells you…

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Martha Ryan

Difference between Stupid, Silly and Dumb

The English language words Stupid, Silly and Dumb have related meanings, but they are all different, as I shall explain, based on common British English usage. Stupid means of low intelligence. "The bank robber was stupid to remove his mask in the building." "This test…

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